CREW (Creative Enterprise West) is focused on supporting and empowering entrepreneurs in the creative technologies and digital design space. We chatted to Ainslie Peters, Programme & Community Manager of CREW. 

‘I am firmly opposed to gatekeeping; good design is for everyone.’  – Ainslie Peters

Can you describe your background and journey to where you are today? 

Like many creatives, I have taken a meandering path to where I am today. I am originally from Canada, and moved to Ireland to work for an organisation that supports children and families affected by childhood illness. Through this work, I had the opportunity to develop programmes internationally and support start-up organisations in Africa, Asia and North America. In 2011, I decided to pause this career and return to education, studying furniture design at ATU Connemara. My academic background is in art history and aesthetic philosophy, and I was keen to explore design in a more hands-on manner. I have been lecturing in Design at ATU’s School of Design and Creative Arts since 2016, and in January joined CREW (Creative Enterprise West) as the Programme and Community Manager.

Tell us about CREW? 

CREW (Creative Enterprise West) is focused on supporting and empowering entrepreneurs in the creative technologies and digital design space. We are currently in the process of building a new Enterprise and Innovation Hub in Galway (at ATU’s Galway City Wellpark Rd campus) and are developing a suite of programmes for creative entrepreneurs. In 2022, our pilot Creative Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Development incubator programme launched; this is a postgraduate certificate delivered in partnership with, and accredited by, ATU’s School of Design and Creative Arts. We are running this programme again this year, and are looking forward to developing more accredited and non accredited programmes for our community. The digital creative industries are growing rapidly, and there is a talented and engaged community in the west of Ireland. We are working to help develop this ecosystem, create opportunities for collaboration, and to support the growth of this sector in the West.

Often bespoke design is seen as something that only certain people can afford. What are your thoughts on this? Great question! More and more, we are seeing innovation lead to increased accessibility. New technologies allow for more customisation, more quickly and more sustainably. I am firmly opposed to gatekeeping; good design is for everyone.

 

Read the full interview in our May/June Issue on shelves now